INK Energy Indicator

Ad blocking detected

Thank you for visiting CanadianInsider.com. We have detected you cannot see ads being served on our site due to blocking. Unfortunately, due to the high cost of data, we cannot serve the requested page without the accompanied ads.

If you have installed ad-blocking software, please disable it (sometimes a complete uninstall is necessary). Private browsing Firefox users should be able to disable tracking protection while visiting our website. Visit Mozilla support for more information. If you do not believe you have any ad-blocking software on your browser, you may want to try another browser, computer or internet service provider. Alternatively, you may consider the following if you want an ad-free experience.

Canadian Insider Club
$299/ year*
Daily Morning INK newsletter
+3 months archive
Canadian Market INK weekly newsletter
+3 months archive
30 publication downloads per month from the PDF store
Top 20 Gold, Top 30 Energy, Top 40 Stock downloads from the PDF store
All benefits of basic registration
No 3rd party display ads
JOIN THE CLUB

* Price is subject to applicable taxes.

Paid subscriptions and memberships are auto-renewing unless cancelled (easily done via the Account Settings Membership Status page after logging in). Once cancelled, a subscription or membership will terminate at the end of the current term.

North American oil & gas insiders showing caution

While Canadian insiders continue to signal that the Energy sector is undervalued, they are being much more cautious in their buying during the current pullback in oil & gas stocks than they were in early winter. The muted response of insiders may be partly explained by trading blackout restrictions. Alternatively, insiders might be content to wait to see how oil markets settle out given the risk of more Iranian crude hitting the market next year on the back of the 6-nation nuclear deal struck in Vienna.

As historic policy decisions loom, Canadian insiders still bet on reflation

The margin of error for policymakers around the globe has not been this narrow since September 15, 2008, the first trading day after the Lehman collapse. However, there is one big difference: the stakes have never been personally higher for individual policymakers.

In particular, German Chancellor Angela Merkel must balance the demands of her conservative political base against the possibility that over-pandering to her supporters could lead to an unwinding of the euro via a Greece exit. In contrast, for Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras a post-euro Greece would no doubt stumble badly; its pain would not be made up for by the fact that Germany would be on the hook for billions of euros in debt.

Subscribe to RSS - INK Energy Indicator